Photo by Drayke Larson - Photosynthetique.com

Portrait Special plus Kay and Carla

These are some images from the super fun photoshoot that I did with Carla and Kay last week, two of my absolute favourite people in the world. Special thanks to Theresa and her hubby for the use of their amazingly cute farm!

As many of you know, I’ve been spending a lot of time lately working in the world of video and audio editing so I’ve been a bit quiet on the photography front. I’m hoping to fix that this summer with lots of equally exciting shoots, and I’m hoping to do so with YOU! To that end, I’m running an on-location portrait special for anyone in the Minneapolis/St Paul area. Just $125 for a standard 2 hour session at a location of your choosing! We’ll get together and make some beautiful images! To book your slot during this special, just send me an email at drayke@photosynthetique.com or call 612-424-9760 (if I don’t answer, make sure to leave voicemail!) before July 1st! I can’t wait to hear from you!

::Drayke//photoSynthetique::

Additional Credits for this shoot:
Carla’s Dress: Samantha Rei
Kay’s Crop Top: Megan Maude
Kay’s Skirt: KMK Designs

 

I landed on the Mun!

If you’re a Kerbal Space Program player, and let’s be honest here: all the awesome people of this world are, you know just how incredibly difficult it is to land on the damn Mun. After having spent two full days learning about pro- and retro-grade manoeuvring, relative velocities and other stuff that a non-physicist should never have need of, I finally did it!

Granted, I was using the MechJeb control module the first time (the built-in lander legs and small monopropellant engines made it significantly easier to keep things intact during the landing attempt) but it was a fully manual attempt and I was just attempting to save myself the trouble of dealing with bits and bobs flying off of my module as I inevitably scraped my way across the Mun surface. I did go back the second time and do it again, this time with good ol’ Jebediah behind the stick. In both cases, I was able to safely return to Kerbin. I have to admit that I feel like I achieved something real here. What a brilliant teaching tool KSP is!

 

There's my Mun lander, Dragon I, happily resting before the return trip to Kerbin.

There’s my Mun lander, Dragon I, happily resting before the return trip to Kerbin.

The Two Old Lady Theory of History

Group (Myself with others, Murman) by Prokudin-Gorskii

Group (Myself with others, Murman) by Prokudin-Gorskii

From a really fascinating article on Pajiba- “The first color photographs and the two old lady theory of history”:

 

“…we see on paper that the Civil War was 150 years ago, and our mind boggles at that span of time. …  But find yourself the right great-grandmother, the sort who likes to tell stories of the alien worlds of a long time ago to the patient kids who prefer to hear strong-voiced tales to running amuck in the yard. Find the right one, and she might just tell you about a time when she was a little girl listening to tales at the feet of her great-grandmother, pass on to you the firsthand words of someone who saw slaves and masters with her own two eyes. Slavery was an eternity ago when you think of 150 years, but it was the day before yesterday if you remember that it was just two old ladies ago.”

Thunder Wolves

Thunder Wolves is one of those games that is totally just mindless fun. Fly your fancy military helicopter around firing unlimited amounts of rockets and gatling ammo at small moving objects on the terrain below you. The graphics are meh and the voice acting is pretty awful but I can get past all of that. I can even handle the fact that they’re going for a super retro late-80’s/early-90’s feel, but some of the “You’re kicking ass” combo messages they plaster across the screen are just downright unacceptable.

Hella sick? Fuck you.

I am going to be hella sick if you say that again.

The 90's called, they want...nevermind.

The 90’s called, they want…nevermind.

Hellz to the Nope

Hellz to the Nope

“I think there …

“I think there are four great motives for writing, at any rate for writing prose. They exist in different degrees in every writer, and in any one writer the proportions will vary from time to time, according to the atmosphere in which he is living. They are:
(i) Sheer egoism. Desire to seem clever, to be talked about, to be remembered after death, to get your own back on the grown-ups who snubbed you in childhood, etc., etc. It is humbug to pretend this is not a motive, and a strong one. Writers share this characteristic with scientists, artists, politicians, lawyers, soldiers, successful businessmen — in short, with the whole top crust of humanity. The great mass of human beings are not acutely selfish. After the age of about thirty they almost abandon the sense of being individuals at all — and live chiefly for others, or are simply smothered under drudgery. But there is also the minority of gifted, willful people who are determined to live their own lives to the end, and writers belong in this class. Serious writers, I should say, are on the whole more vain and self-centered than journalists, though less interested in money.”

-George Orwell, 1946, Why I Write

I identified with this passage far more than I would ordinarily let on, but Orwell said it, so at least I’m in good company.